Das bedrohte Riff

Das 2000 Kilometer lange Great Barrier Reef ist bedroht. Dennoch setzt es die Unesco nicht auf die rote Liste des gefährdeten Weltnaturerbes.

Tourists stand in front of huts that form part of the Lady Elliot Island Eco Resort where a turtle digs for food amongst the coral in the island's lagoon, north-east of the town of Bundaberg in Queensland, Australia, June 9, 2015. UNESCO World Heritage delegates recently snorkelled on Australia’s Great Barrier Reef, thousands of coral reefs, which stretch over 2,000 km off the northeast coast. Surrounded by manta rays, dolphins and reef sharks, their mission was to check the health of the world's largest living ecosystem, which brings in billions of dollars a year in tourism. Some coral has been badly damaged and animal species, including dugong and large green turtles, are threatened. UNESCO will say on Wednesday whether it will place the reef on a list of endangered World Heritage sites, a move the Australian government wants to avoid at all costs, having lobbied hard overseas. Earlier this year, UNESCO said the reef's outlook was "poor". REUTERS/David Gray TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY PICTURE 13 OF 23 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY "GREAT BARRIER REEF AT RISK" SEARCH "GRAY REEF" FOR ALL PICTURES      TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY

Das bedrohte Riff: Die UNESCO setzt das Great Barrier Reef vor der Nordostküste Australiens nicht auf die rote Liste des gefährdeten Weltnaturerbes. Bild: David Gray/Reuters

Peter Gash (L), owner and manager of the Lady Elliot Island Eco Resort, snorkels with Oliver Lanyon and Lewis Marshall, senior rangers in the Great Barrier Reef region for the Queenlsand Parks and Wildlife Service, at Lady Elliot Island, north-east of the town of Bundaberg in Queensland, Australia, June 11, 2015. They are carrying out an inspection of the reef's condition in an area called the 'Coral Gardens'. Gash snorkels every morning before he attends to managing duties on the island, and was showing the Great Barrier Reef rangers the current condition of the reef. UNESCO World Heritage delegates recently snorkelled on Australia’s Great Barrier Reef, thousands of coral reefs, which stretch over 2,000 km off the northeast coast. Surrounded by manta rays, dolphins and reef sharks, their mission was to check the health of the world's largest living ecosystem, which brings in billions of dollars a year in tourism. Some coral has been badly damaged and animal species, including dugong and large green turtles, are threatened. UNESCO will say on Wednesday whether it will place the reef on a list of endangered World Heritage sites, a move the Australian government wants to avoid at all costs, having lobbied hard overseas. Earlier this year, UNESCO said the reef's outlook was "poor". REUTERS/David Gray TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY PICTURE 10 OF 23 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY "GREAT BARRIER REEF AT RISK" SEARCH "GRAY REEF" FOR ALL PICTURES      TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY

Kontrollgang unter Wasser: Peter Gash vom Eco Resort auf Lady Elliot Island inspiziert mit den beiden Riff-Aufsehern den Zustand der Korallen im Gebiet Coral Gardens. (15. Juni 2015) Bild: David Gray/Reuters

Tourists snorkel near a turtle as it looks for food amongst the coral in the lagoon at Lady Elliot Island north-east of the town of Bundaberg in Queensland, Australia, June 9, 2015. The lagoon, which is occupied by turtles during high tide, is only accessible for snorkelling during this time. UNESCO World Heritage delegates recently snorkelled on Australia’s Great Barrier Reef, thousands of coral reefs, which stretch over 2,000 km off the northeast coast. Surrounded by manta rays, dolphins and reef sharks, their mission was to check the health of the world's largest living ecosystem, which brings in billions of dollars a year in tourism. Some coral has been badly damaged and animal species, including dugong and large green turtles, are threatened. UNESCO will say on Wednesday whether it will place the reef on a list of endangered World Heritage sites, a move the Australian government wants to avoid at all costs, having lobbied hard overseas. Earlier this year, UNESCO said the reef's outlook was "poor".  REUTERS/David Gray PICTURE 9 OF 23 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY "GREAT BARRIER REEF AT RISK" SEARCH "GRAY REEF" FOR ALL PICTURES

Das Great Barrier Reef ist das grösste Ökosystem und bei Touristen sehr beliebt: Viele Korallen und Tierarten sind in den letzten Jahren eingegangen oder bedroht. (9. Juni 2015) Bild: David Gray/Reuters

This undated photo released by the Australian Institute of Marine Science, shows white coral syndrome in Great Barrier Reef, Australia. Coral reefs in much of the Pacific Ocean are dying faster than previously thought, according to a study released Wednesday, Aug. 8, 2007, with the decline driven by climate change, disease and coastal development.  (AP Photo/Australian Institute of Marine Science)

Das sieht schlecht aus: Diese undatierte Aufnahme zeigt Korallen im Great Barrier Reef, welche beinahe alle Farbe verloren haben. Das Syndrom heisst Korallenbleiche und führt meistens zu einem Absterben der betroffenen Teile. Bild: AP, Keystone

A boat carrying tourists floats above an area called the 'Coral Gardens' near Lady Elliot Island, north-east of the town of Bundaberg in Queensland, Australia, June 10, 2015. UNESCO World Heritage delegates recently snorkelled on Australia’s Great Barrier Reef, thousands of coral reefs, which stretch over 2,000 km off the northeast coast. Surrounded by manta rays, dolphins and reef sharks, their mission was to check the health of the world's largest living ecosystem, which brings in billions of dollars a year in tourism. Some coral has been badly damaged and animal species, including dugong and large green turtles, are threatened. UNESCO will say on Wednesday whether it will place the reef on a list of endangered World Heritage sites, a move the Australian government wants to avoid at all costs, having lobbied hard overseas. Earlier this year, UNESCO said the reef's outlook was "poor".  REUTERS/David Gray PICTURE 7 OF 23 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY "GREAT BARRIER REEF AT RISK" SEARCH "GRAY REEF" FOR ALL PICTURES

Nach wie vor beliebt: Ein Touristenboot bringt die Schnorchel-Fans zum Korallengarten im Barrier Reef. (10. Juni 2015) Bild: David Gray/Reuters

A tourist swims on the Great Barrier Reef in this undated file picture. Fishing will be banned from about one third of the Australian reef under a draft rescue plan unveiled by the Australian government May 30. The coral reef, which is one of Australia's most popular tourist attractions, is under threat from record temperatures, over-fishing and pollution. EDITORIAL USE ONLY REUTERS/HO/Great Barrier Reef National Park Authority DG/RCS - RTROQYG

Fischen verboten: Seit Mai 2003 ist zumindest in einem Teil des Riffs das Fischen nicht mehr erlaubt. Bild: Reuters

Protesters hold banners outside the headquarters of the Commonwealth Bank to say no to coal expansion on the Great Barrier Reef as part of "Global Divestment Day" in Sydney on February 13, 2015. The protesters called on Australian banks to rule out funding for a coal port expansion in the Great Barrier Reef World Heritage Area to kick off a series of activities taking place all over the world for the first ever Global Divestment Day organisers said.  AFP PHOTO/Peter PARKS

Trotz Protesten von Naturschützern und der Tourismusindustrie: Letztes Jahr hat Australien dem Bau des weltgrössten Kohlehafens nahe des Great Barrier Reef zugestimmt. Somit dürfen drei Millionen Tonnen Schlamm in das Meeresreservat gekippt werden. (13. Februar 2015) Bild: Peter Parks/AFP

epa04814946 Greenpeace activists display a 'Choose Coral Not Coal' banner outside the flagship branch of Hong Kong's Standard Chartered Bank in the city's financial district, during a protest calling on the bank to withdraw its financing of the controversial Carmichael coal mine in Australia’s Galilee Basin, in Hong Kong, China, 23 June 2015.  EPA/ALEX HOFFORD

Protestaktion in China: In Hongkong fordern Greenpeace-Aktivisten die Standard Chartered Bank auf, die Finanzierung des umstrittenen Kohlewerks im australischen Galilee Basin zu stoppen. (23. Juni 2015) Bild: Alex Hofford (EPA, Keystone)

TO GO WITH AFP STORY "Australia-resources-environment,focus" by Madeleine Coorey (FILES) This handout photo released on April 5, 2010 and taken on April 4 by the Queensland Government shows a small amount of oil leaking from the Chinese coal carrier the Shen Neng 1 after the vessel ran aground near Australia's Great Barrier Reef off the coast of the state of Queensland late on April 3.  Australian authorities were attempting on April 5, 2010 to stabilise the stranded Chinese coal carrier which is threatening to break up on the Great Barrier Reef and spill more oil into the pristine waters.    RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE      AFP PHOTO / Queensland Government / HO / FILES

Auf kostbaren Grund gelaufen: Das chinesische Kohlefrachtschiff Shen Neng 1 läuft im April 2010 in der Nähe des Great Barrier Reef auf Grund und verliert eine… Bild: AFP

epa02117319 A picture made available on 15 April 2010 shows oil from Chinese coal ship Shen Neng 1 washed ashore at Northwest Island, Australia, on 14 April 2010. Oil globules averaging the size of a 10 cent peice were spread across the north face of the island where clean up crews worked.  EPA/JEFF CAMDEN / POOL AUSTRALIA AND NEW ZEALAND OUT

…beträchtliche Menge an Öl, welche bald darauf an den Strand der australischen Northwest Island gespült wird. (15. April 2015) Bild: Jeff Camden (EPA, Keystone)

Peter Gash, owner and manager of the Lady Elliot Island Eco Resort, prepares to snorkel during an inspection of the reef's condition in an area called the 'Coral Gardens' located at Lady Elliot Island, north-east of the town of Bundaberg in Queensland, Australia, June 11, 2015. Gash snorkels every morning before he attends to managing duties on the island. UNESCO World Heritage delegates recently snorkelled on Australia’s Great Barrier Reef, thousands of coral reefs, which stretch over 2,000 km off the northeast coast. Surrounded by manta rays, dolphins and reef sharks, their mission was to check the health of the world's largest living ecosystem, which brings in billions of dollars a year in tourism. Some coral has been badly damaged and animal species, including dugong and large green turtles, are threatened. UNESCO will say on Wednesday whether it will place the reef on a list of endangered World Heritage sites, a move the Australian government wants to avoid at all costs, having lobbied hard overseas. Earlier this year, UNESCO said the reef's outlook was "poor". REUTERS/David Gray PICTURE 14 OF 23 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY "GREAT BARRIER REEF AT RISK" SEARCH "GRAY REEF" FOR ALL PICTURES

Hoffte vergeblich auf einen positiven Bescheid der Unesco: Peter Gash vom Lady Elliot Eco Resort liegt der Erhalt der Korallenpracht am Herzen. (11. Juni 2015) Bild: David Gray/Reuters

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